Showing posts with label Persuasive Essays. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Persuasive Essays. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Argumentative Essay

Pick an issue you care about and argue your point. The assignment is to write an argumentative essay. The key is to have facts to back up your opinion.

  1. Pick a topic question from the lists below.
  2. Begin with a topic sentence/introduction that shares your opinion.
  3. Research the issue and find at least two sources with facts that support your position.
  4. Find and rewrite three or more of the best facts that support your opinion. These will be the topic sentences for the paragraphs in your body.
  5. Write supporting details for each of these facts. These should not be opinions, thoughts, or ideas.
  6. Write a conclusion that restates your opinion, gives an interesting fact/point/idea about the topic, and wraps up the essay.
  7. Read the essay aloud to find mistakes/areas that are not clear.
Argumentative Essay Topics

    • Using cell phones make people more/less connected
    • Social media and texting hurt/improve the lives of teenagers
    • Violent video games cause/don't people to act out violently
    • Reading online is better/worse than reading a book
    • Helicopter parents help/harm their children
    • Recycling really makes/does not make a difference
    • Schools should/should not have vending machines that sell sodas, candy, and other "bad" snacks
    • Cell phones should/should not be banned in schools for both students and teachers
    • Students should/should not wear school uniforms
    • Students should/should not be held back for bad grades
    • Using animals for scientific research is/is not inhumane
    • Fast food, soda, chips and other unhealthy food should/should not be heavily taxed
    • Watching TV is good/bad for children
    • Athletes caught using steroids should/should not be banned from professional sports for life
    • Students should/should not have to learn cursive writing
    • Parents should/should not monitor what their kids are doing online
    • Social life is/is not more important than academics
    • Home schooling is more/less effective than public schools
    • Charter schools are more/less effective than public schools
    • Social media improves/reduces students reading skills
    • Social media improves/reduces students writing skills
    • Violent sports like boxing and MMA should/should not be banned
    • Sports involving animals should/should not be banned
    • Violent movies increase/do not increase teen violence
    • Lotteries should/should not be banned
    • Sports betting should/should not be legal
    • Carrying a concealed weapon should/should not be legal
    • Gun control reduces/does not reduce crime
    • Praying in school should/should not be legal
    • Youtube should/should not be legal under 18 years old
    • Cigarette smoking should/should not be banned



    Wednesday, February 25, 2015

    Year-round School Essay

    Don't let this be you!



    Image from grammarly.com

    Monday, February 9, 2015

    A Good Argument

    Students recently completed an Argumentative Essay Project. The following essay was written by Emma A. She did an excellent job of organization and supporting her opinion.

    I think parents should limit social media use. I think they should because too much time on social media can put teen’s mental health in jeopardy. Social media can be addictive. Studies show that 63% of people log on to Facebook daily, and about 40% log on multiple times a day.

    Social media also leads to a higher risk for cyberbullying. Sixty-seven percent of cyberbullying comes from instant messaging. Peer pressure is another thing that cyberbullying leads to. That affects our mental health because too much pressure can cause teens and people of any age to make bad decisions such as smoking, doing drugs, and drinking alcohol.

    Using social media can also lead to low self-esteem. This can cause depression and anxiety.  The University of Michigan collected data about Facebook users and how it changed their moods. It showed that people who use Facebook daily have shown lower satisfaction for their life and Facebook as they use it more and more. It can also lead to fear of missing out, or FOMO. It is a form of social anxiety.

    Social media is sometimes a good idea, but it can be very bad in some ways. The good things about using social media, such as Facebook, Instagram and many more improves your heart rate because it relaxes you,  and increases productivity. Just a 10 minute break can make employees happier and they will get more work done. They are many more ways that social media can be good, but not bad.

    In conclusion, I think that social media use should be limited not only for teens, but for everyone. Too much time on social media can cause mental disorders, social anxiety, and peer pressure, and many more. Social media can be good as well, but for the most part it is bad for teens, especially. So I think social media use should be limited not only for teens but for everyone.

    Year-round Schools Argumentative Essay Organization





    Reading Workshop students, your task is to write an editorial stating your position on year-round schooling.

    Be sure to include:
    • An engaging opening that states your opinion
    • At least two separate supporting arguments/reasons, with supporting details from at least two sources
    • An explanation of the other side and your reasoning against it
    • A conclusion restating your opinion and a call to action (what you want people to do)
    • Citation of your sources at the end of your essay

    Listed below is an organizational/format aid.

    Introduction
    1. Statement of opinion--Students would/would not benefit from year-round schools.
    2. Two or three sentences that provide background information to the reader (you may want to do this after you write paragraphs two and three).

    Body First Paragraph
    1. Topic sentence that tells the topic of supporting evidence you will use in this paragraph. It might sound something like, Students that attend school year-round . . .
    2. Supporting sentences with facts and/or information from sources.

    Body Second Paragraph
    1. Topic sentence that tells the topic of supporting evidence you will use in this paragraph. It might sound something like, Another benefit/detriment of year-round school . . .
    2. Supporting sentences with facts and/or information from sources.

    Body Third Paragraph
    1. Topic sentence that tells the opposing viewpoint. It might sound something like, Some people might say . . .
    2. Supporting information of the opposing viewpoint
    3. Your rebuttal--reasons that this viewpoint is wrong

    Conclusion
    1. Restate the statement of opinion from the introduction
    2. Wrap up your essay with final points that sum up your argument. 

    Tuesday, March 3, 2009

    Community Service, One Student's View

    Recently in the Reading Workshop, students have been writing persuasive essays. This is a guest post by student author Rachael J.

    Kids should be really encouraged to be a part of community service. The reason I believe this is because the University of Michigan says that “it is common knowledge that volunteers get much more out of their service experience than they expect.” Sometimes kids really need to get their hands dirty to see how rewarding community service can be! Community service can really be a better teaching tool than sitting in a classroom. Kids learn more if they actually do something.

    Community service has made huge differences in student's motivation and in communities. Researcher Diane Hedin indicates, “the biggest problem students must overcome in school is a lack of motivation” (Hedin 1989) If a student is dreading school because “it's boring”, that can be changed! Get the students involved! Kids like to feel needed! They like to know that they did something that someone would appreciate. “One of the most effective ways is by strengthening students’ relationships with their community and helping them become more personally engaged in their education through national service ( http://sitemaker.umich.edu/356.black/homes).

    Community service makes students feel good. I know this because I got involved. It was on Make a Difference day and Mrs. Woods asked for volunteers. I did not know what I was going to be doing that day, but I then found out that it was raking leaves for people that could not do it themselves. Now, I have plenty of leaves to rake at home, so I have raked leaves before. Our neighbors get mad if we don’t rake them up because they would blow into their yard. Anyway, it felt really good to do something for others and they really appreciate it. Plus, it cleaned up our community, right here in Laurelville, the town that is not even found on a map.

    Little things can make a huge difference. Cleaning up your community might even improve your community's ways of life. If you have a clean and environmentally-friendly community, then the people inside the community can go outside without finding a hobo in their dumpster. What does this have to do with community service and students? Well, as the saying goes, you get back what you give, but you get back even more with volunteering for community service. With just a few hours of your time, you help your community, and in the long run, your community helps you.

    A clean community can give back in many ways. Students can help their community in so many ways. They can supply fresh air for us to breath, clean water for us to drink, healthy crops for us to eat, and an awesome community to live in. Seriously, if you want to keep Hocking County beautiful then make a difference and get out there and help your community.

    You can read more of Rachael's work on her blog, Notes From Rachael.
    *

    Tuesday, February 17, 2009

    Searching Successfully

    As we return to persuasive essay projects this week, some students are still attempting to find more information to support their position. All good opinion papers have specific details, fact, and statistics to support their point of view. Finding and organizing the data is often the most challenging part of this writing project. This takes hard work, and some Internet savvy.

    At some point during the school year, almost every student has jumped on Google to find information. Because each student has their own PC, they quickly become use to using them as a tool, whether they need to find information, as a dictionary, or thesaurus. However, when searching for specific information, it takes slightly different skills.

    One area of focus is the use of key words. Students must try a variety of search terms, and skim through the results to find the most relevant information. Also, when searching for facts about a topic, using words that relate to for or against an issue is imperative.

    Examples of words that show support of an issue include:
    for, pro, benefit, agree, positive effect, good points, reasons for

    Examples of words that demonstrate disagreement with an issue include:
    against, con, no, disagree, bad, problems with, negative effects

    Just including one of these words usually narrows search results, helping find usable facts and statistics to support an opinion.

    In addition, students watched this video on Google basics.




    A persuasive essay will only be as good as the research that supports it. To convince the reader that you are right, you have to have the facts to make your point.
    *

    Wednesday, January 14, 2009

    Why Skimming Matters Most

    Is skimming the most important skill needed by readers today? In the technology driven, Web 2.0 world, readers are faced with information overload. Just the number of words thrown out at readers on the Internet causes an overload for struggling readers. Web pages are jammed with facts, opinions and statistics. Links to everywhere just wait to lead the reader astray.

    Just looking at the main page of the Reading Workshop blog must be daunting for someone struggling to get through the words. On top of that, you have the words in different colors and in different places. The day of just reading from top to bottom and left to right is over. Now readers must know, at a glance, what is relevant.

    This week as we began reading and writing persuasive essays, the challenges of just a simple Google search overwhelmed some struggling readers. Limited vocabulary made for unsuccessful or irrelevant searches for many students. Even when provided with key words, the need to quickly skim the results and evaluate for relevancy, was quite a challenge.

    Determining whether or not an article was just on topic, or if it provided information to support a persuasive essay was another challenge. Students searched for facts to support their opinions. Just this part of the writing/reading process was hard work.

    In order to search successfully, students needed to follow these steps:
    1. Choose appropriate search terms,
    2. Skim the search results,
    3. Find links that most likely fit the topic,
    4. Determine if the web pages provided appropriate information,
    5. Decide if sites might include facts to support their opinion,
    6. Go to the websites and skim for facts and information,
    7. Save appropriate information and sources,

    On top of these tasks, the ever-present web filter blocked many search results, and students only had 30 minutes of class time. Even faced with all of these obstacles, many students found research results with statistics and facts to begin to build a convincing persuasive essay.

    As students continue their search today, maybe the best topic to write about would be "Skimming is the Most Important Reading Skill."

    *