Showing posts with label Blog Topics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Blog Topics. Show all posts

Thursday, November 16, 2017

What Should I Write?

March | 2011 | clairsimpson

Need an idea for a blog topic? Here are a few.
  1.  You Should Read . . .
  2.  My Favorite Book
  3.  Best Character in a Book
  4.  Interview a Family Member/Role Model
  5.  “How to” Post
  6.  Memoir--Share a Memory
  7.  Write about an Event From Your Life
  8.  Hobby Post
  9.  Write a Story
  10.  What I Saw at ________ Today
  11.  Respond to Another Post
  12.  Write a Poem
  13.  How to Write A Blog Post
  14.  Opinion Post
  15.  FAQ post
  16.  News Story
  17.  Write A Letter
  18.  Inspirational Post
  19.  Inspirational People Post
  20.  My Biggest Fear
  21.  "My Future" Post
  22.  Write From Someone Else's Point of View
  23.  Compare/Contrast Post
  24.  How I Stay Inspired
  25.  How to Succeed 
  26.  Favorite TV/Movie Star
  27.  Make a List
  28.  A Day In the Life Of…
  29.  School Survival Post
  30.  How to Be a Friend Post
  31.  Getting Good Grades 
  32.  Bucket List
  33.  Holiday Post
  34.  Slideshow
  35.  Advice Post
  36.  Turn a Post into a Poem
  37.  Sports Story
  38.  Top 10
  39.  If You Had to Live with a Handicap
  40.  Places--Where Would You Like to Go?
  41.  Facts Post
  42.  What I Want to Be . . .
  43.  My Goals for The Future
  44.  Write About Your Favorite Artist (Musician)
  45.  Write a Response to a Topic in the News
  46.  Tell About a Lesson Learned
  47.  Write a Play

Image from

Friday, December 26, 2008

Top 10 for 2008

As 2008 comes to a close, this is the Top 10 posts of 2008 on The Reading Workshop blog.

Everyone loves the beach, and the favorite post of 2008 had to do with bikinis and highlighting.

Questioning courage was popular as discussed in the post, Courage, Do You Have It?

Two posts discussing the trends in reading and writing by teens were popular in Teen Writing, ru lol? and Is Surfing the Net Reading?

Everyone seemed to wonder, Do We Really Need Books?

Knowing What Doesn't Matter when you are reading was important to many readers.

Lots of people seemed to want to be Smarter Than a Seventh Grader, and read about how this helped students prepare for the Ohio Achievement Test.

Many students seemed to want to Be on the Road to Smarter.

The Where Am I's? were a favorite of last year's class with Where Am I #5 having 107 comments until Josh and Caleb nailed it down.

I Hate Reading and I Don't Hate Reading, two posts that discussed a student's struggle with how he feels about reading gathered a lot of interest.

Thanks to Alltop, which lists top educational news and blogs for placing The Reading Workshop on their site in October of 2008. Joanne Jacobs also shared posts from the blog. Hopefully everyone found at least one post that made it worth the time visiting . Thank you for reading!

Thursday, December 4, 2008

Who Wants to Know about The Reading Workshop

Of the last 500 visitors:

They came from 35 states.
They came from 16 countries.
Sixteen visitors were from Texas.
Thirteen were from California
Twelve were from New York.
'Ten were from Florida.
Sixty five visits was the most by any one person.
Fifty nine was the second most times visited.
Two Hundred Sixty Nine started out on The Reading Workshop home page.
Twenty-two had questions about how to do Reading Workshop.
Sixteen had questions about Study Island.
Seven queried good books for student readers
Six wondered about the book Freak the Mighty.
Fifteen had question about listening to music as you work.
Twelve wanted information about the affect of texting on students' writing.
Thirteen visited for longer than an hour.
Thirty six wanted to know about Rambunctious Reading.
Ninety two percent that used a search engine, used Google.
Sixty seven percent are first time visitors.
One Hundred Eighty are using the newest version of Firefox.
Seventeen came from the latest Carnival of Education which list Educational blogs
Seventeen came from the Laurelville Elementary website.
Twelve came from Alltop which lists education news and headlines from across the web.
Three came from Joann Jacobs educational blog highlights and links.

So if you're like me and find yourself wondering, who cares about The Reading Workshop at Laurelville, the answer is a lot of people, from a lot of places, for a lot of different reasons. For all that take the time to visit the blog, thank you!.

Thursday, November 20, 2008

Top 10 Overused Awards Assembly Comments

According to Doug Johnson, on the Blue Skunk Blog most of us would prefer shallow wit to deep intelligence in our writers and speakers. Thank goodness. Granted, this is taken from his biases, but I read it on the internet, so I know it is true.
I guess that justifies publishing much of what we read on blogs. Using this line of reasoning, I can write many a post that veers on the edge of smartalecky. I can throw it out there and justify it by saying that I am just trying to share a little humor.
Oh well, here it goes--my top 10 tired and overused comments at an awards assembly.
1. I am so proud . . .
2. She is doing sooooo much better . . .
3. I never get an award.
4. He gets all the awards.
5. This is boring.
7. This is the best class . . .
8. I knew I wouldn't get an award because he doesn't like me.
9. She is a teacher's pet.
10. Keep trying and you will get an award next time (when pigs can fly). Oh sorry, somehow my thoughts snuck in here.
Can guess which are the teachers' comments and which are the students? By the way, have you figured out that we had an awards assembly yesterday?

Congrats to all of the award winners!

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Where are the Workshop "How To's?"

What is most important to know about reading workshop? Some might say knowing what mini-lessons to teach is especially important. Others might think the format and how to set up a workshop is most significant. Activities students complete might be the choice from some that carries the most weight.

And the next question is, where should a blog called The Reading Workshop focus? Should it be on how a workshop looks and what activities take place? Or is it about students from classes in a workshop? I started thinking about this after I got this email.

I really like reading your blog . . .
Have you ever considered more posts with "how to's?" So many of your posts are about the students. I enjoy reading about them, but I think most teachers would like more on how to do reading workshop.

After reading this email a few times, and thinking about it for a couple of day, I thought about what controls my reading workshop day-to-day and how that has changed.
Originally it was the "experts." I read In the Middle and modeled my class after it. Today there are thousands of sites to get the "how to's." Nancie Atwell is still an excellent resource for the fundamentals of reading and writing workshop. The internet is filled with ideas for teaching, and examples from classes.

For me though, reading workshop starts and ends with the students. Every activity is only as valuable as it is relevant to the class I am teaching. The best book only matters if it reaches the student. And it is only the best book because of what it makes a student think and feel. The best lesson is only good because of how it impacts the class and the students. A good journal topic only matters if it lets a student share a thought, idea, or opinion that is meaningful to him.

It all starts and it all ends with the students. That should be the focus.

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Blog Topics

We were sitting in the circle talking about the Writer's Block post, when Amber asked, "do you ever ask for suggestions about blog topics?"

"Great idea," I replied.

Amber, other students, parents, and teachers, please comment. Give me your ideas. I am especially interested in ideas about reading, books, Reading Workshop, education, and our class at Laurelville. However, I will most certainly consider any topic relevant to what we are doing. In fact, you never know, I might consider any topic, whether relevant or not. So, throw out your ideas. If I use a topic you suggest, you will receive a prize that may be worth millions of dollars.