Showing posts with label Read at Home. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Read at Home. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Reading Any Way You Choose


Pick one of the ways of reading listed below, have someone take a picture or take a selfie, post it on your blog and you get 20 minutes of Read at Home credit plus you can log the minutes you read. You can do 5 of these a week, make your blog great, and get an A on your Read at Home all at the same time.

You can blog from a browser on your phone or tablet using Chrome, Firefox, or Edge. You can also post using the Edublog app with Android or Wordpress.org app using an IPhone or IPad.


Reading…
and
More Reading

Read a picture book

Listen to a parent or guardian read

Read closed-captioning on the TV

Read a chapter book

Read to a parent or guardian

Read with a pointer or finger puppet

Read and solve math word problems

Read in bed, past your bedtime

Read a story or book you wrote

Read a recipe aloud, step-by-step, while you help someone cook

Read a book about something you know nothing about

Read with a book club you created or joined

Read while eating

Read a book you love AGAIN

Read with your friends or neighbors

Listen to audio books
Read a book that became a movie
Collect words in a jar, diary, or app

Read a biography about a person you admire or don’t know

Read to the family pet or stuffed animal

Take turns reading a page at a time

Read at the local library, bookstore, restaurant, or coffee shop

Read a book that will teach you a new skill, trade, or technology

Read with a grandparent

Read about a state or country

Read with a brother or sister

Read in the bathtub (no water)

Read a book from your favorite author

Read to babies and toddlers

Read and sing song lyrics with the artist or choir

Read to family or friends with Skype or Facetime

Read a comic book or joke book

Organize your  bookshelves

Follow a recipe from a cook book

Volunteer to read at a retirement home, nursing home, or hospital

Create a puppet show

Read a craft book

Read at the park or playground

Read about caring for animals

Compile and share the shopping list

Read while riding on the bus or when riding in a plane, train, or
automobile

Read about a place you’d like to visit

Read a blog and respond with a positive comment

Read about fitness and exercise

Make or update a memories scrapbook with captions and/or titles

Read at the beach or poolside

Read a book that takes place in the past or future

Read at the laundromat or do the laundry while a parent reads to you

Read about your favorite sport or team

Keep a shared journal with
someone Take turns writing back
and forth

Read out loud with animated voices that go along with each character

Read a magazine or newspaper

Play reading games like Scrabble, Boggle, crossword puzzles
Read a folktale, fairy tale, or myth

Donate books to charity or check out books from the local library

Read a play, musical, or poetry

Read with a flashlight

Read a spooky book or mystery

Create a video of you reading and share it on your blog

Rewrite the ending of a book you found boring or confusing

Read a book that received an award or honor

Design, record, and share
commercials about books

Read while you wait at a restaurant, dentist, doctor’s office, or airport

Read about holidays, traditions, or cultures from around the world

Do a book talk or book trailer that tells all about your favorite book

Read cereal boxes, catalogs, flyers,
billboard signs, or street signs

Read on an eBook or iBook
















































Monday, October 24, 2016

Reading Assignment


Students are required to read at home as homework. Students must read 20 minutes each night Monday – Thursday and one time over the weekend (Friday – Sunday) for 20 minutes. Students should have a time every night to do their reading homework. Students that do not complete this will have serve detention to make up for missed time.

Students' Weekly Reading Assignment rewards effort. Students choose a book that they want to read from home, the library, or the bookmobile. The only requirement is that they log the title, time read, and pages. 

Any time students read it counts towards their weekly minutes. They will read each day at school during SSR--Sustained Silent Reading time (10:55-11:10). In addition, they can read at home, on the bus, while they are eating breakfast, once they finish a test or assignment in another class. Any time they read it counts towards their grade.

Reading Assignment Grading Scale

A =
180 + Minutes
B =    120 - 179 Minutes
C =    60 - 119 Minutes
F =    Less than 60 minutes and/or less than 4 times a week.

Extra credit will be given for students that read more than 225 minutes in a week.

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Weekly Reading Assignment

Each week students have an assignment to read at home. Students choose a book that they want to read from home, the library, or the book room. The only requirement is that they log the date, title, time read, and pages. Students are responsible for filling out this bookmark/chart each week as they read. All minutes read outside of language arts class count towards their grade. Occasionally, students will have longer than a week when the school schedule is affected by holidays.

Students can choose to earn the grade they want. The more they read, the higher the score. A large part of their language arts grade is based on this weekly assignment.

This is the grade scale:

A = 180 + Minutes
B = 120 - 179 Minutes
C = 60 - 119 Minutes
F = 0-59 Minutes


Although students have no direct assignments associated with the Read at Home assignment and the Reading Log, many of the activities and projects in class are based on the book they are reading.

The best part of this system for monitoring reading, and increasing reading time is how students can control their grades. If they are willing to work hard, their grades will show it.

Thursday, March 19, 2015

The Last 20 Pages

Please complete the form below.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Support Your Writing with Details!

Reading Workshop students, please copy and paste the latest writing topic about the book you are reading, "Could You be the Main Character?" To see more about this project you can see all responses to this topic on the Question Board.

Thursday, November 6, 2014

What Happened in the Book Last Night?

Here is an example written by Trinity T. in about 15 minutes.

Gecko had stolen a car from a lady. He was trying to find his brother Reuben but couldn't find him on foot. He was under age to be driving. He was only 13! The lady called the cops and he had cops after him in a few moments of driving. He was going about 80 mph down the highway trying to find his brother. He finally found his brother running out of the door at a game store with a bunch of games. Gecko figured his brother was stealing the games. Reuben spotted Gecko and ran to the back door. He hopped in with all of the games in his hands.

The cops started to catch up with him and soon were on their tail. Up ahead was an old lady pushing a stroller with a baby in it. Gecko swerved the car and the car started to spin. Gecko slammed on the brakes and the car stopped. Gecko noticed that he had missed the old lady. He sighed in relief. The cops were long gone. No where to be seen. So he headed back to the house. Gecko started to think that his life needs to change.

This is from the Gordon Korman book, The Juvie Three.


Monday, October 6, 2014

Why We Read in Class

I have always believed reading makes the best readers. That is the reason behind the Read at Home assignment. Recently I found an article on Twitter that talked about reading in school and how some teachers and their assignments kill students' love of reading.

One part states:

I don’t have time for in-class reading.” Have you ever said this? I used to say it all of the time. If you commit to instilling a love of reading in your students (the most important part of education), then you must make time to read in class–every single day! Two or three times weekly isn’t good enough. Readers read daily; it’s this simple. The single best lesson I ever learned is this: books are the best teachers. Books are more important. Let your students read.

I can't say it any better. This is why The Reading Workshop is based first and foremost on reading.

Image from http://msrosenthalsclassroom.wikispaces.com/

Friday, September 19, 2014

What Happened in the Book Last Night?

Friday, February 28, 2014

An Assignment Checklist

We have a new program to give students a hand. Students will receive a checklist to help them identify things they need to accomplish during Brave Period. Then, student and parent volunteers will help them complete tasks on the “To Do” list. Each week students will fill out and staple an Assignment Checklist in their agenda books, so you can follow up at home to see if there are assignments your child needs complete.


The volunteers will help check Jupiter Grades with the students and then work on missing assignments. They will also help with Study Island lessons, ongoing writing assignments like blog essays and answering the Question of the Week. They will give a hand with social studies or science projects, and assist with homework. 

Hopefully this will help all students as they work to be successful.

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Did You "Get" Your Book?

Thursday, December 12, 2013

How Does Your Child Stack Up?

Brylee, A 50 Page/Day Reader
The Read at Home assignment is a major part of sixth grade language arts as Salt Creek. Nothing builds reading skills and the ability to comprehend like time spent reading. That is the reason the Read at Home assignment rewards those that read more with a higher grade.

As you may know, the grade is based on minutes read each week. As a teacher, I reward the students that make the most effort. Although grades are not entirely tied to how hard a student works, poor grades are reflective of a lack of work ethic. If a student wants a better grade, just read a little more.


A = 180 + Minutes
B = 120 - 179 Minutes
C = 60 - 119 Minutes
F = 0 - 59 Minutes


Plus, if students read more than 180 minutes I give extra credit. The students from our hallway (Classes 601-604) have averaged reading 232 minutes each week. All Students will be bringing home a letter that tells how many minutes they have averaged reading.



You can see all the responses HERE.



Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Read Your Way to a Good Grade

Students weekly Read at Home assignment rewards extra effort. Students choose a book that they want to read from home, the library, or the bookmobile. The only requirement is that they log the title, time read, and pages.

As a teacher, I reward the students that make the most effort. Although grades are not entirely tied to how hard a student works, poor grades are reflective of a lack of work ethic.  If a student wants a better grade, just read a little more.  I even give extra credit for students that read more than 180 minutes.


A =    180 + Minutes
B =    120 - 179 Minutes
C =    60 - 119 Minutes
F =    0 - 59 Minutes

Although students have no direct assignments associated with Read at Home many of the activities and projects in class are based on the book they are reading. When students write about their book, it is easy to monitor comprehension and see if students are "getting it." The fact that students can pick their book to read helps because they can find a book that interests them.

So if you want a good grade Reading Workshop students, all you have to do is read!

Friday, March 15, 2013

An Amazing Story of a Reader

Savannah never read a chapter book before this year.  Somehow she got to six grade and never finished a chapter book.  She was a fake reader.  She tried reading Scat five times last year.  She kept getting lost and restarting.  It didn't matter because she didn't get it anyway.  Besides, reading gave her a headache.  

Talking about second grade she said, "They pulled me out because I couldn't read. I was just below average."  In her pullout class, she had to read these little books and little pamplet stories.  She just really didn't read though.

Her grandpa started the change.  He would read with her.  He would help her figure out the words.  It started with One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.  That was the only book she liked.

She came to sixth grade and had to start logging her reading for her Read at Home assignment.  At first she just logged what she wanted her goal to be so she had to read that night.  Then she found The Hunger Games.  She connected to the story and it made her want to read.  She finished the series and found other good books to read.

Before she knew what happened, she began to read because she liked it.  Now she reads at least an hour each night.  Her mom has to make her stop reading.  She reads books, understands them, and writes about them.  The last book she read she finished in two days.  She's an amazing story and the story is just beginning.  Great things are ahead for this girl that just became a reader.

Monday, December 10, 2012

Reading Success by Selecting a Series

What do the three students in the picture have in common?  All three were reluctant readers that have found success through the choice of an excellent series.  Doing the weekly Read at Home assignment in Reading Workshop was a chore.  They didn't take advantage of the opportunity to improve their grade.  Then they started a good series of books.

Fictional series have a common setting, story, and/or characters. Some series have a specific order, usually based on chronological sequence.  Others stand alone and can be read in any order sharing a similar genre, but sometimes not even sharing characters.

Connor blasted through The Spiderwick Chronicles.  This is a fantasy series written by Holly Black and Tony DiTerlizzi that features three kids, Jared, Simon, and Mallory Grace as they travel to another world filled with faeries and other mystical creatures.  He read all of the first series and has moved on to the next series, Beyond the Spiderwick Chronicles.

Taneshia starting reading Among the Hidden, the first book in the Shadow Children series written by Margaret Peterson Haddix.  These books take place in the future and show the challenges faced by Luke, a third child in a society that only allows two per family.  

Mackenzie has been reading the Vet Volunteers books written by Laurie Halse Anderson.  This series is a little different than most because it features different characters in each book.  There is a common theme though--all are trying to help animals in need.

What makes these three students so remarkable is their transition as a reader.  They found a series they like and have actually stuck with books, finishing one after another.  There is no fake reading going on here.  They have become successful readers and students.   

It seems like almost all readers have read a series or two that sticks with them forever.  What is your favorite series?

Friday, October 5, 2012

The Easy Way to Get a Good Grade

Students weekly Read at Home assignment rewards extra effort. Students choose a book that they want to read from home, the library, or the book room. The only requirement is that they log the title, time read, and pages.

As a teacher, I reward the students that make the most effort. Although grades are not entirely tied to how hard a student works, poor grades are reflective of a lack of work ethic.  If a student wants a better grade, just read a little more.  I even give extra credit for students that read more than 180 minutes.



A =    180 + Minutes
B =    120 - 179 Minutes
C =    60 - 119 Minutes
F =    0-59 Minutes

Although students have no direct assignments associated with Read at Home many of the activities and projects in class are based on the book they are reading. When students write about their book, it is easy to monitor comprehension and see if students are "getting it." The fact that students can pick their book to read helps because they can find a book that interests them.

The emphasis on reading is largely based on the research from Richard Allington. Allington cites four "background factors" associated with why students have difficulty with reading. According to the author:

1. the amount of reading that students do in and out of school was related to reading achievement;
2. children who spend more time on workbook activities versus reading text are more likely to have difficulty reading;
3. children who come from homes where reading is not modeled have difficulty reading; and,
4. students who have difficulty providing details and arguments to support interpretations of what they read have difficulty with reading.


According to the author, time on task is the best predictor for reading success in students. Put simply, more reading is equal to greater academic achievement.

The bottom line--if students read more, their grade improves and they become better students.

Monday, December 19, 2011

Reading During Christmas Break

Are you going to have a little spare time over the holidays?  Want to do something enjoyable and earn some extra credit?  All you have to do is READ!

If you complete two or more books over break, and comment on them, you will earn extra credit!  

The best part is the more you read, the more extra credit you earn.  And it will count as minutes on the next Read at Home assignment, too.  A couple of years ago, one student read over 1,400 minutes during Christmas break.  How many books will you read?

Monday, October 11, 2010

Honestly, Why Didn't She Just Lie

Students have to read at home 180 minutes each week to earn an "A."  When she turned in her paper, she had read for 170 minutes.  She's a bright girl and could easily have fudged a few minutes here and there to get up to 180.  So why didn't she?

The Read at Home assignment is based on the honor system.  The only real check is whether or not students comprehend the book and can write about it.  Parents don't have to sign off.  Students fill out their reading times.  And students clearly understand that the more they read, the better their grade.

So why didn't this girl, who is extremely driven by grades, add on enough time to get an A?   Last year we discussed integrity and I was a little surprised and a lot pleased with students' responses.  I thought of this again, and felt good about today's students.

Although Cassie didn't get an "A" she earned a whole lot more.  She got my respect and my appreciation.  For herself, she got a feeling of satisfaction in knowing that she did the right thing, and she is an honorable person.

Why didn't she just lie?  She's way too smart and has way too much integrity for that.

Image from http://simplecomplexity.net/data-integrity-what-does-it-really-mean-why-is-it-important/